It’s only an iPhone!

I recently received an email from Emil Pakarlis that reminded me of attitudes, questions and bias I see on a daily basis about capturing content with a mobile device.

While there is no question that there are more things you can do with “pro line” cameras, it doesn’t mean the “device you have with you” isn’t worthy of consideration. This preconceived notion tends to color our judgement.

The Problem is Attitude!

Consider Emil’s thoughts on the subject.

iPhoneography

The best camera is “the one you have with you.”

The one thing that holds back 98% of people taking photos with the iPhone has nothing to do with talent, experience or megapixels. And it’s affects new photographers as well as seasoned  professionals coming from traditional photography.

When most people pick up a DSLR or dedicated video camera, they generally treat it seriously. They spend a few seconds composing the shot. They walk around to find the best angle. They make sure that their subject is well exposed and in focus. That may take a few seconds, but it’s time well spent.

Most iPhone users however casually capture the first thing they see without even thinking about composition, angle and exposure, because they think the iPhone is only good for taking quick snapshots.

And guess what? They never get anything other than quick snapshots out of their iPhone’s camera.

Fortunately, there’s another group of iPhone owners, albeit a smaller one, who recognize that the iPhone is a powerful camera so they give each shot the attention it deserves.

The iPhone is their preferred camera and it’s often the only camera they use. They think about subject, composition, focus and exposure before they press the shutter.

These people constantly capture amazing images with the iPhone.

Of course, attitude is not the only thing that makes a difference in iPhoneography but without the right attitude, you’ll never move past the snapshot mentality.

Creating Video Packages With Your iPhone

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Photography Guidebook for iPad, iPod and iPhone

Apple Distinguished Educators continue to create comprehensive support and training materials for educators. One of the most recent is the Photography Guidebook for iPad, iPhone and iPod. Continue reading

Digital Photography Tips

Digital photography is changing the way we take photos.  It has made us more productive, creative and sloppy all at the same time.

We can shoot thousands of pictures without needing to pay for developing just to see if we “got a good one.”  This underscores the idea that the difference between a recreational photographer and a good photographer is the unseen pictures. Continue reading

iPhoneography

Smaller….faster…..better…..more powerful.  Our always connected mindset has spawned a whole new generation of high-tech tools.  You can now shoot, edit and deliver content in many ways using a variety of tools.  We may have the tools but do we know how to use them?  The following tools, tech and training sites offer some interesting perspectives.

Vimeo video editing app “Cameo”

iPhone video editing apps

Just Creative 5 best photo apps

Best iPhone camera editing apps

Shoot video like a pro on your phone

Mobile video tips and techniques

Jack Hollingsworth on iPhoneography

iPhone video image capture    (This is a quick option that works on Cronkite computers.) Image capture is in your applications folder.

iPhone video downloader

Al Thompkins Video Blog Tips

iPhoto for iPhone and iPad

Camera Awesome: Cool Camera App

Filmic Pro/Movie Pro

Best sites to learn about iPhoneography by Make Use Of

iPhoneography in Education

Vericorder

If you have additional tools, ideas, tips or techniques please enter them in the comments section and I’ll review and post them.

Photo Elements

I am often asked what is the best camera.  Naturally I have my own personal preferences.  After a lot of thought I think the best camera is the one you have with you at the moment.  No amount of discussion of lenses, F-stops, sensors and mega pixels will do any good if you don’t have a camera with you that will allow you to manage all the tech stuff.  You can however capture quality images using even a cell phone if you become a master of its capabilities and learn to manage light and composition.  Here are a few helpful tips and tricks.

Photoelements

Photo Composition

Video Tips and Tricks

People always seem to make the same mistakes when shooting video.
•Making a subject appear as if they are in the witness protection plan because the background is too bright.
•Positioning a person in such a way it looks like a tree is growing out of his/her head.
•Shooting boring shots of buildings with no action.
•Placing a subject in front of a background that is the same color as their clothing.

We’ve all seen them so why do they keep happening? Here are a few tips to help you shoot better video. Continue reading