Photoshop Ethics

Just because we can doesn’t mean we should.  That pretty well sums up Photoshop ethics.  Your job as a photojournalist is not to create the moment or the story but to capture it.  To that extent there really isn’t a lot required if you have captured a great image to begin with.  My general rule of thumb is that minor cropping, color correction and dodging are about all that is necessary.  The photo should accurately and truthfully tell the story by itself.

Steve Elliot from Cronkite News Service created this great presentation for the Reynolds Institute that illustrates some of the ethical challenges confronted by our media.

Photoshop_ethics2

Photo Elements

I am often asked what is the best camera.  Naturally I have my own personal preferences.  After a lot of thought I think the best camera is the one you have with you at the moment.  No amount of discussion of lenses, F-stops, sensors and mega pixels will do any good if you don’t have a camera with you that will allow you to manage all the tech stuff.  You can however capture quality images using even a cell phone if you become a master of its capabilities and learn to manage light and composition.  Here are a few helpful tips and tricks.

Photoelements

Photo Composition

Social Media Guidelines for Student Journalists

The Cronkite School encourages participants in its professional programs to make use of social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter, which are valuable reporting tools and promotional and distribution channels for our content. To ensure the highest journalistic standards in these programs, participants must abide by the following standards for social media use drawn from The Poynter Institute for Media Studies and the Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics. Continue reading

Global Achievement Gap-Understanding the Situation

Amidst the scathing indictments of our current educational system there is much that is positive. Changes are being made at local levels. In fact as Charles Leadbeater,

Roundtables and discussion groups exchange and explore perspectives

Roundtables and discussion groups exchange and explore perspectives

consultant for innovation in education in the United Kingdom suggests, “Education + Skill training + technology = Hope.”

Educators must however realize that: “Most innovation comes from collaboration. Most effective learning occurs as a result of collaboration. Our current system of education can’t deliver the necessary outcomes with the current teachers and techniques that are in place.”

Systemic transformation will only occur when new attitudes and delivery techniques are universally used to address the needs of the workplace and the motivations of what is now being described as the “Net Generation.”

The current generation of learners is very different from their teachers. They are accustomed to instant gratification. The “always on” connection has resulted in a physical re-wiring of their brains.

They use the web for extending friendships, interest driven learning, self-directed inquiry and view the Internet as a tool for self-expression.

They are constantly connected, creating and multitasking in a multimedia world everywhere except school. Young people aged 8-18 spend 7 hrs and 38 minutes a day using electronic devices. If you factor in multitasking that time increases to 13 hours.

They have less fear than their predecessors. They have less respect for authority and want coaching or mentoring not lecturing. They want and need to “make a difference.”

In order to truly transform education, educators must reframe everything to address the needs of the world and its learners.