It’s only an iPhone!

I recently received an email from Emil Pakarlis that reminded me of attitudes, questions and bias I see on a daily basis about capturing content with a mobile device.

While there is no question that there are more things you can do with “pro line” cameras, it doesn’t mean the “device you have with you” isn’t worthy of consideration. This preconceived notion tends to color our judgement.

The Problem is Attitude!

Consider Emil’s thoughts on the subject.

iPhoneography

The best camera is “the one you have with you.”

The one thing that holds back 98% of people taking photos with the iPhone has nothing to do with talent, experience or megapixels. And it’s affects new photographers as well as seasoned  professionals coming from traditional photography.

When most people pick up a DSLR or dedicated video camera, they generally treat it seriously. They spend a few seconds composing the shot. They walk around to find the best angle. They make sure that their subject is well exposed and in focus. That may take a few seconds, but it’s time well spent.

Most iPhone users however casually capture the first thing they see without even thinking about composition, angle and exposure, because they think the iPhone is only good for taking quick snapshots.

And guess what? They never get anything other than quick snapshots out of their iPhone’s camera.

Fortunately, there’s another group of iPhone owners, albeit a smaller one, who recognize that the iPhone is a powerful camera so they give each shot the attention it deserves.

The iPhone is their preferred camera and it’s often the only camera they use. They think about subject, composition, focus and exposure before they press the shutter.

These people constantly capture amazing images with the iPhone.

Of course, attitude is not the only thing that makes a difference in iPhoneography but without the right attitude, you’ll never move past the snapshot mentality.

Creating Video Packages With Your iPhone

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iPhoneography

Smaller….faster…..better…..more powerful.  Our always connected mindset has spawned a whole new generation of high-tech tools.  You can now shoot, edit and deliver content in many ways using a variety of tools.  We may have the tools but do we know how to use them?  The following tools, tech and training sites offer some interesting perspectives.

Vimeo video editing app “Cameo”

iPhone video editing apps

Just Creative 5 best photo apps

Best iPhone camera editing apps

Shoot video like a pro on your phone

Mobile video tips and techniques

Jack Hollingsworth on iPhoneography

iPhone video image capture    (This is a quick option that works on Cronkite computers.) Image capture is in your applications folder.

iPhone video downloader

Al Thompkins Video Blog Tips

iPhoto for iPhone and iPad

Camera Awesome: Cool Camera App

Filmic Pro/Movie Pro

Best sites to learn about iPhoneography by Make Use Of

iPhoneography in Education

Vericorder

If you have additional tools, ideas, tips or techniques please enter them in the comments section and I’ll review and post them.

Using Sony Handicams and Importing to FCP

Instructions courtesy of Stephen Elliott.  Cronkite News Service Director

USING SONY HD HANDYCAMS AND GETTING VIDEO INTO FINALCUT

Take a Deep Breath

Seriously – I want you to take a deep breath. Close your eyes and find a place of zen. Envision yourself turning on the camera, pointing it at something or someone you want to document, hitting the record button and capturing crisp video. Believe it or not, most video cameras today are this easy to use. This doesn’t make it easier to choose the right scenes and subjects, frame properly, etc., but it makes things a lot easier before you do. The camera you will use in this class also has a hard drive, making exporting video much easier than a camera recording on tape.

Camera Basics

Here is a rough representation of the business end of the Handycam, focusing on the few features you need to understand to make it work.

  1. This wheel turns the camcorder off and on.
  2. This button stops and starts recording.
  3. Here’s the viewscreen. Flip it out from the side of the camera.
  4. The battery goes here. It’s secured by a latch underneath.
  5. Direct view into lens. Just forget this exists. Use the viewscreen.
  6. These are various items on the viewscreen that it helps to know.
  7. Zoom lever. Continue reading

Video Tips and Tricks

People always seem to make the same mistakes when shooting video.
•Making a subject appear as if they are in the witness protection plan because the background is too bright.
•Positioning a person in such a way it looks like a tree is growing out of his/her head.
•Shooting boring shots of buildings with no action.
•Placing a subject in front of a background that is the same color as their clothing.

We’ve all seen them so why do they keep happening? Here are a few tips to help you shoot better video. Continue reading